Your invitations are the first glimpse your guests will see of your wedding brand and the first impression they’ll have of your big day. Once you’ve found your perfect stationery design, it’s time to choose the wording for your wedding invitations. We’ve put together a range of traditional and modern wedding invitation wording for you.

 

What should you include on your wedding invitations?

No matter their style or your degree of formality, when it comes to the right wording for your wedding invitations, be sure to include:

  • names of the hosts

  • first and last names of the couple

  • where the ceremony is taking place

  • date, month and year of the wedding ceremony

  • location of the wedding reception (if different from ceremony)

  • address to which guests should reply

  • a reply date

 

You might also wish to include:

  • travel information

  • details of any dress code

  • whether children are invited

 

Who sends out the wedding invitations?

Invitations are always sent from whoever is hosting the wedding ‐ traditionally the bride’s parents. The wording becomes more complicated if parents are divorced or if the couple is holding the event themselves. The usual wording for a traditional invitation is:

Mr. & Mrs. James Jones

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Susan Jones to Neil Wood

at St Mary’s Church, Milton,

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

Reception to Follow

(reception venue)

 

More wording examples

Who is hosting your wedding? Below are sample wordings for:

  • one set of married parents

  • both sets of married parents

  • you’re hosting your own wedding

  • you with both sets of parents

  • a single parent

  • a divorced parent with their spouse

  • jointly hosted by divorced parents

 

 

One Set of Parents

Mr & Mrs Hanks

Request the honour of your presence at the marriage of their daughter

Natasha Ruth

to Tim Hugh

son of

Mr & Mrs Brown

 

Both sets of parents

Mr & Mrs Hanks

and

Mr & Mrs Brown

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Natasha Ruth

to Tim Hugh

 

You’re hosting your own

Ms Natasha Ruth Hank

and

Mr Tim Hugh Brown

request the pleasure of your company

at their marriage

 

A single parent

Mr Hanks

requests the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of his daughter

Natasha Ruth

to

Tim Hugh

 

 

A divorced parent with their spouse

Jane & Tom Hanks

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of Jane Hanks’ daughter

Natasha Ruth

to

Tim Hugh


 

Jointly hosted by divorced parents

Mr Hanks

and

Mrs Smith

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Natasha Ruth

to

Tim Hugh

son of

Mr & Mrs Brown

The traditional approach

If you want to follow traditional invitation style, here are a few conventions to note:

  • Invitations are generally written in the third person.

  • When listing the time, date and venue, the time and date should be written first and the venue last.

  • Use titles when appropriate.

  • ‘The honour of your presence’ or ‘The pleasure of your company’ is the normal choice of wording. The former is often used for invitations to religious ceremonies such as a church wedding; the latter for invitations to an event in a non‐religious venue.

  • How you break up the lines is up to you. Generally, names, times and places are placed on separate lines.

  • Wording can be adapted to accommodate different circumstances due to death, divorce and re‐marriage on the bride’s side. For example:

    • (if either parent is widowed):
      Mr James Jones / Mrs Pamela Jones, requests the pleasure…

    • (parents are divorced):
      Mr James Jones and Mrs Pamela Jones request the pleasure…

    • (parents divorced, mother remarried):
      Mr James Jones and Mrs Paula Matthews request…

  • Continental Europeans and practicing members of the Jewish community send cards including the names of both sets of parents eg: Mr and Mrs James Jones request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of their daughter Susan to Neil, son of Mr & Mrs Simon Berg.

 

 

Inviting children

  • If children are invited, make this clear by including their names on their parents’ invitation. Parents might assume that the invitation is for them alone if their children’s names are not specified.

  • It can be tactful to include a short note to parents, such as: ‘Much as we would like to invite all the children of our friends, it is only possible to accommodate the children of close family’, or, ‘We are sorry we are unable to accommodate children’. If you are inviting children, let parents know if you have made special childcare arrangements: ‘We have arranged child‐minding facilities for the duration of the service and/or reception’.



Invitations to the reception or an evening party

  • If space is limited at your ceremony venue, you may wish to invite more guests along to the reception afterwards. You may then decide to invite even more guests for your party in the evening.

  • A reception invitation will ‘request the pleasure of your company’.  An evening party invite can be equally formal, but can also be informal depending on the style of your wedding.

Atlanta, GA  |  Chattanooga, TN  |  Rome, GA

  • White Instagram Icon
  • w-facebook
  • W-Pinterest
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Yelp Icon

404.969.6140

@papermadelovely

hello@papermadelovely.com

© papermadelovely 2019